Top of Page
Skip main navigation
MS Criminal Justice

M.S. in Criminal Justice

A Master of Science in Criminal Justice will shape you into the hero your community needs.

With the M.S. in Criminal Justice, you can learn the ins and outs of the criminal justice system. Get trained through an interdisciplinary focus in an online environment needed. Discover your niche through our core curriculum and specialty concentrations. Whether you are looking to get promoted, sharpen critical skills within the field, or make a career shift in a rewarding profession, the NSU edge will give you the tools to stand out as a leader and make the world a safer place.

We proudly offer the Valor Award 20% Scholarship for law enforcement officials, veterans, military and first responders.

Delivery Options

Coursework for the Master of Science in Criminal Justice is conducted entirely online, allowing you to earn your degree without work disruption or long commutes.

Concentration Tracks

  • Legal Perspectives
  • Behavioral Science
  • Business Administration
  • Public Administration
  • Substance Abuse
  • Strategic Community Planning
  • Information Systems
  • Conflict & Crisis Management
  • Child Protection and Juvenile Justice
  • Information Security
  • Investigative Forensic Technology
  • Emergency Preparedness Leadership

Who Should Apply

Individuals seeking careers in:

State Law Enforcement
  • Police Officer
  • County Sheriff/Deputy Sheriff
  • State Trooper/Highway Patrol Officer
  • Canine Officer/K9 Handler
Environmental Law Enforcement
  • Game Warden/Conservation Officer
  • Animal Cruelty Investigator
  • Park Ranger
Specialty Law Enforcement
  • Detective
  • Correctional Officer
  • Correctional Counselor
  • Parole Officer
  • Legal Assistant or Legal Researcher
  • Bailiff
  • Pretrial Officer
  • Loss Prevention Officer/Loss Prevention Manager
  • Bounty Hunter/Bail Enforcement Agent
  • Public Safety Officer
  • Community Liaison
Federal Law Enforcement
  • Detective
  • FBI Special Agent
  • DEA Agent
  • Secret Service Special Agent
  • ICE Special Agent
  • Federal Air Marshall

Curriculum

This master's program comprises 30 credits: 15 credits (5 courses) of core curriculum, 12 credits (4 courses) of a specialty concentration, and 3 elective credits (one course).

CJI 0510 - Survey Issues in Criminal Justice (3 credits)

This course will review historical context, theory, policy making, political factors, and behavioral influences related to criminal justice policy development.

CJI 0520 - Social Administration of Criminal Justice (3 credits)

This course will provide an overview of the federal, state, and local criminal justice systems. An introduction to management and methods of conflict management will be provided.

CJI 0530 - Legal Issues in Criminal Justice (3 credits)

This course will provide an overview to the legal issues that govern criminal justice activities that will included state and constitutional perspectives of law. An historical development of the various statutes that regulate criminal justice activities will be provided.

CJI 0540 - Program Evaluation in Criminal Justice (3 credits)

This course will provide a fundamental analysis of research and methodology as related to evaluation of criminal justice administration. Included in this course will be an introduction to statistical analysis and the use of current technology.

CJI 0550 - Investigative Processes (3 credits)

This course will provide a fundamental background for investigative processes to include the responsibilities of the investigator from the initial crime scene all the way through follow-up. Felony cases will be used to demonstrate examples of criminal principles.

Legal Perspectives

Concentration Description:

This concentration will provide specialized training in the fundamentals of criminal law and procedure, criminal evidence and legal writing for the non-lawyer. It will also provide specific training regarding procedural and legal issues that affect the criminal justice system. It will offer an in-depth knowledge of criminal law and enable the criminal justice professional to interface with lawyers regarding legal issues that may arise during the criminal investigation. Consequently, the concentration will provide knowledge and skills to those who work in law enforcement and criminal justice agencies, and related organizations and who are required to have a working knowledge of the theory and application of criminal law

CJI 6110 - Criminal Evidence (3 credits)

This first course in the criminal justice concentration will offer students an in-depth analysis of the Federal Rules of Evidence as a legal foundation for understanding criminal law and procedure. Topics covered will include trial procedure, examination of witnesses, circumstantial evidence, opinion evidence, hearsay and character evidence, privileged communications, declarations against interests, presumptions and judicial notice.

CJI 6120 - Advanced Criminal Procedure (3 credits)

This course will provide the criminal justice professional with an in-depth introduction to the role of the court, the law, and the judge. It will include the advanced study of the constitution with a specific focus on the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Amendments. The impact of these provisions during a criminal investigation will be examined with a focus on arrest, warrants, Miranda, the right to counsel and the exclusionary rule

CJI 6130 - Criminal Law (3 credits)

This course will introduce students to the common law elements and principles of criminal law as a legal foundation for understanding the criminal justice system. It will include the study of substantive criminal law including offenses against persons and property, public morality, public health, public order and safety, and justice and public administration. Alcohol and drug offenses, white collar and organized crime and criminal responsibility and defenses will also be covered.

CJI 6140 -Legal Research Methods and Reasoning (3 credits)

The law is never static. Students will learn to review and apply newly issued laws or legal decisions in day-to-day activities. This course will enable students to find the law, to read and understand legal statutes and regulations, and to understand the analytic process lawmakers and lawyers use.

CJI 6150 - Selected Issues in Forensic and Social Science (3 credits)

This final course in the concentration is intended to offer the criminal justice professional an opportunity to conduct in-depth analysis of forensic and social science as an administrative tool for litigation.

Social Sciences in the law will enable the student to understand the interrelationship between the forensic science, social science and the admission of evidence. Topics covered will include social sciences as a basis for determining facts and making law.

Behavioral Science

(Offered through the College of Psychology)

Concentration Description:

This concentration will provide specialization training in the behavioral science issues, providing knowledge and skills to those who work in law enforcement and criminal justice agencies

PSY 0695 - Law Enforcement and the Mentally Disordered Offender (3 credits)

This course provides students with knowledge of the various forms of mental disorders and disabilities that law enforcement officers will likely see in people during their policing careers. Understanding the origin of various forms of mental illness together with practical application for law enforcement officers in how to recognize techniques for handling victims and offenders will be addressed. Topics include distinguishing behavioral problems such as those caused by temporary situations such as grief or abuse impact from those of a long-lasting and pervasive impact from internal events like delusions and hallucinations, differentiating impulsive behavior caused by immaturity, bi-polar disorder, or brain dysfunction, understanding mental retardation versus psychotic behavior, figuring out who needs to be immediately taken to a detoxification center, and identifying those who might be attempting to avoid consequences of their violent behavior. Focus is also on helping law enforcement officers identify those who need to be deferred into specialty courts such as mental health, drug, and domestic violence courts as well as management of the mentally ill once they are detained. Victim impact will also be discussed.

PSY 0694 - Police Psychology and Criminology (3 credits)

The purpose of this course is to examine current strategies and issues in the field of police psychology. Specific topics that will be covered include: selection and fitness for duty evaluations, mental health issues in law enforcement (e.g., stress, family problems, critical incident debriefings, and domestic violence), role of psychology in crisis (hostage) negotiations, and supportive functions of the police psychologist in police operations. Tactical operations and police procedures relevant to the work of the police psychologist also will be covered.

PSY 0693/PSY 0913 - Behavioral Criminology (3 credits)

The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with various techniques for analyzing and understanding criminal behavior through crime and crime scene analysis. These techniques include an introduction to the fundamentals of criminal investigative analysis and profiling. Critical thinking skills will be emphasized in crime and crime scene analysis in order to draw logical inferences regarding any underlying psychopathology, motive, criminal history or other dynamics unique to that particular offender.

PSY 0692 - Police Stress and Mental Health (3 credits)

This course provides and overview of stress management in law enforcement. The course will cover the physiological and psychological basis of the stress response. The physical, emotional, mental, rational, and spiritual signs of distress will be examined. Understanding, recognizing, and coping with the stressors associated with modern policing helps prevent maladaptive responses such as domestic violence and suicide. Lectures and case studies will emphasize the application of successful stress management techniques within a law enforcement context.

PSY 0691 - Forensic Psychology (3 credits)

This course will cover topics dealing with interaction of psychology and criminal law. Topics to be covered include: insanity, competency to stand trial, clinical assessment of dangerousness, delinquency, and the evaluation of malingering.

Business Administration

(Offered through the H. Wayne Huizenga College of Business and Entrepreneurship)

Concentration Description:

This concentration will provide specialization training in the issues of business administration, providing knowledge and skills to those who work in law enforcement and criminal justice agencies.

MKT 5125 - Marketing Decisions for Managers (3 credits)

Students will gain a working knowledge of the decisions marketing managers make by learning to think strategically. Students will develop marketing plans aligning marketing decisions and strategies. Students will be able to implement marketing decisions to optimize customer and organizational value.

HRM 5310 - Managing Human Resources (3 credits)

Students will gain a working knowledge of planning, organizing, and managing human resource systems; and will gain hands-on abilities to design, direct, and assess human resource systems in enhancing relationships with internal and external customers, leading to organizational effectiveness.

MGT 5631: Leading People and Organizations (3 credits)

This course investigates strategies and skills for influencing individuals and groups for organizational effectiveness.  Students will learn leadership models and skills that can be used in a diverse and global environment.  Attention will be given to important leadership issues in the 21st century such as ethics, change, and innovation. Students will have the opportunity to assess their own skill sets and consider development plans for enhancing those skills sets. 

MGT 5380: Building and Leading Teams (3 credits)

This course focuses on how to build and lead successful teams to strengthen the overall performance of organizations. Team building models will be analyzed with emphasis on actionable steps that can be taken to overcome common hurdles and build cohesive, high performing teams. An emphasis will be placed on the role of the leader in developing successful work teams, project teams, virtual teams, and inter-organizational teams.

Public Administration

(Offered through the H. Wayne Huizenga College of Business and Entrepreneurship)

Concentration Description:

This concentration will provide specialization training in the issues of public administration, providing knowledge and skills to those who work in law enforcement and criminal justice agencies.

PUB 5439 - Administrative Law and Ethics in the Public Sector (3 credits)

The course introduces students to the field of ethics and shows how ethical principles are applied to administrative agencies to ensure not only legal, but also moral government decision-making. Administrative law is the body of law concerned with the actions of administrative agencies, frequently called the "4th branch of government" in the United States. The course thus examines how administrative agencies are created, how they exercise their powers, how they make laws and policy formally, as well as informally, the laws that govern agency rulemaking and adjudications, especially the Administrative Procedure Act, Constitutional and other legal protections afforded against agency actions, and how agency actions are reviewed and remedied by the courts and legislative branch of government. This course also will develop the student’s legal research skills in locating and identifying federal, state and local administrative regulations and rules and Florida attorney general and ethics commission advisory opinions for practical use in the student’s public sector roles. The course examines the intergovernmental relations and the political and practical constraints that influence administrative policy.

PUB 5409 - Public Administration in Theory and Application (3 credits)

This course provides an overview of the field of public administration by focusing on theoretical foundation and practical knowledge. The aim of this course is to familiarize students with the basic principles, context, environment, organizational structure, and contemporary issues in public administration. This course addresses the cultural, institutional, political, and ethical constructs of public administration in theory and practice.

HRM 5310 -  Managing Human Resources (3 credits) 

Students will gain a working knowledge of planning, organizing, and managing human resource systems; and will gain hands-on abilities to design, direct, and assess human resource systems in enhancing relationships with internal and external customers, leading to organizational effectiveness.

PUB 5438 - Public and Non-Profit Strategic Management (3 credits)

This course provides a hands-on approach to public and non-profit strategic management. Special emphasis is placed on budgeting, long-term financial planning, and operations management.

Substance Abuse

Concentration Description:

This concentration will provide specialization training in the issues of substance abuse, providing knowledge and skills to those who work in law enforcement and criminal justice agencies.

CJI 6510 - Psychopharmacology of Illicit and Licit Drugs (3 credits)

This course reviews the physical and psychodynamic effects of legal and illegal drugs. Mental disorders, symptomatology, assessment measures for addicts and dual diagnosis, along with a thorough examination of the DSM-IV.

CJI 6520 - Alcohol and Other Drug Treatment in the Criminal Justice System (3 credits)

This course will examine treatment and intervention approaches that are effective with the offenders in correctional settings. Such topics to be introduced are drug and alcohol treatment in correctional institutions, treatment modalities, principles of the therapeutic communities, characteristics and traits of the offender and issues related to the transition into the community.

CJI 6530 - Substance Abuse Treatment in the Community (3 credits)

This course introduces various models of community based programs for the substance abuse involved offender, research regarding factors of recidivism, treatment matching, case management, relapse prevention techniques, setting treatment goals, resources in the community and DUI and drug court operations.

CJI 6540 - Cultural Factors in Treatment ( 3 credits)

This course will introduce students to cultural and racial identity development, The impact that class, race, ethnicity and sexual orientation have on court disposition, sentencing and the correctional process, culturally specific treatment techniques, racial and sexual dynamics in institutional settings and in community programs, including knowledge of cross-cultural interviewing skills.

CJI 6550 - Special Topics in Substance Abuse Services & Criminal Justice System (3 credits)

This course is designed to give the student an opportunity to research a specific topic related to substance abuse services and the Criminal Justice System. Students are expected to work in an independent fashion and engage in in-depth research through the use of various sources. Such sources may include journal articles, books, online resources, and other scholarly works as deemed appropriate by the instructor. Students will receive guidance from the instructor regarding topic selection, along with scope and focus of the required paper.

Strategic Community Planning

CARM 5040 -The Human Factor (3 credits)

This course presents communication theories relevant to conflict resolution as well as theories about understanding, analyzing, and managing conflict. The course focuses on the human and emotional aspects of conflict, and includes the influence of gender and culture. This course is pragmatic as well as theoretical, and presents communication and conflict resolution models in a practice based approach.

CARM 6638  - Conflict and Crisis Management (3 credits)

This course is an overview of the theories of conflict and crisis management and the intervention models and protocols used. Conflict and crisis management will be explored among and between individuals and groups, organizations, communities, and governments around the globe. Topics will include the management of violent conflicts, such as kidnapping, hostage-barricade and terrorist acts, homeland security, and the response to natural disasters. There will be interactive exercises as well as a case study approach used.

CARM 6610 - Family Violence: The Effects on Families, Communities and Workplaces (3 credits)

This course explores the overall effects of trauma and violence on individuals, families, communities, and the workplace. Issues of abuse, violence, and systemic responses are explored in relation to their effect on individual behavior, family dynamics, service provision, and community systems. Methods for identifying such issues in the context of family mediation and other types of conflict intervention are explored.

CARM 6619 - Strategic Community Planning and Partnerships  (3 credits)

An overview of the community from a strategic perspective, identifying: social, economic, demographic and cultural trends and patterns within the community; areas of concern for law enforcement and government; ways to initiate and develop community-wide strategic planning for peaceful community relations and growth; building community partnerships between law enforcement, the criminal justice system and community agencies and groups; community justice; and the use of data, data collection and analysis in developing and implementing collaborative long and short term plans for community development, problem solving and funding initiatives.

CARM 6611 - Race and Ethnic Relations in America  (3 credits)

This course examines the social constructionist approach toward the study of racial and ethnic conflict and conflict analysis in the U.S. It is designed to assist students in increasing their ability to analyze racial issues from a historical and contemporary perspective, and to explore the basic theoretical paradigms that have been used to conceptualize the idea of race and ethnicity from the 19th century to the present. The course will also explore the effects of contemporary policies in addressing racial and ethnic inequities, and strategies to combat racism.

CARM 6634 - Metropolitan Conflict (3 credits)

This course will explore historical and theoretical explanations for the different types of conflict prevalent in various metropolitan areas. A series of case studies, focusing on both cities within the United States and abroad, students will explore such topics as the role of ethnicity in conflict, structural inequalities of the system, urban/suburban relations, urbanization, and metropolitan growth and development.

Information Systems

(Offered through the College of Computing and Engineering)

Concentration Description:

This concentration will focus on the application of technological concepts of information systems to the collection, retention, and dissemination of information for management planning and decision making.

ISEC 0635 - Information Security Operations Management (3 credits)

Provides an understanding to implement effectively the information security vision and strategy set forth by the executive management. The emphasis will be on the management of an information security program. Focus is on the implementation of information security policy, information security planning, development of information security processes, and establishment of information security measures. Concepts and techniques from the management and organizational behavior disciplines will be integrated in order to identify and propose solutions to the problems of information security administration. Prerequisite: ISEC 615

MMIS 0623 - Information Privacy and Ethics (3 credits)

In this course we examine the impact of the computer and the Internet on our society. Topics include ethical decision-making and frameworks, professional codes, free speech, intellectual property, cybercrime, privacy, security, and digital identity.

MSIT 0630 - Database System (3 credits)

Methodologies and principles of database analysis and design are presented. Conceptual modeling and specifications of databases, database design process and tools, functional analysis, the entity-relationship model, and advanced semantic modeling methods are discussed. Topics include theories of database systems, including the architectures of database systems, logical and physical database organizations, data models for database systems (network, hierarchical, relational, and object-oriented model), relational algebra and calculus, query languages, normal forms, null values and partial information, relational database design utilizing dependencies, view design and integration, concurrency control, query optimization, client-server database applications, distributed databases, object-oriented databases, and the current research and development trends of database analysis, design, modeling, and applications.

MMIS 0653 - Telecommunication and Computer Networking (3 credits)

This course provides a framework for understanding computer network functionality, characteristics, and configurations. Topics include network topologies, protocols, and architectures and emerging trends in network technologies and services. The role of optical technologies in supporting national and international implementations is explored. Strategies for network planning, implementation, management, and security are introduced. Recent advances in standardization, internetworking, and deployment of LANs (local area networks), MANs (metropolitan area networks), and WANs (wide area networks) are introduced.

Conflict & Crisis Management

(Offered through the Halmos College of Arts and Sciences)

Concentration Description:

This concentration will provide specialization training in law enforcement conflict and crisis management, emphasizing nonviolent, negotiation-oriented approaches to both individual and organizational responses to hostage/barricade and other crisis situations. The concentration will provide knowledge and skills to those who work in law enforcement and criminal justice agencies, and related organizations.

CARM 6170 - Violence Prevention and Intervention (3 credits)

This course examines various theories of human aggression and violence, exploring their underlying assumptions about human nature and the causes of violence. Also included is an introduction to a range of violence intervention and prevention approaches developed for use at the interpersonal, intergroup, and societal level.

CARM 5040 - The Human Factor (3 credits)

This course presents communication theories relevant to conflict resolution as well as theories about understanding, analyzing, and managing conflict. The course focuses on the human and emotional aspects of conflict, and includes the influence of gender and culture. This course is pragmatic as well as theoretical, and presents communication and conflict resolution models in a practice-based approach.

CARM 6641 - Conflict and Crisis Negotiation (3 credits)

This course will provide an overview of law enforcement crisis negotiation and its application to crisis situations, such as domestic violence encounters on an individual level and hostage/barricade encounters on an organizational level. Lecture, expert demonstration, and interactive negotiation with role play will provide an experiential learning environment for understanding and applying active listening skills, empathy, rapport, influence, and behavioral change concepts to conflict and crisis situations.

CARM 6638 - Conflict and Crisis Management (3 credits)

This course is an overview of the theories of conflict and crisis management and the intervention models and protocols used. Conflict and crisis management will be explored among and between individuals and groups, organizations, communities, and governments around the globe. Topics will include the management of violent conflicts, such as kidnapping, hostage-barricade and terrorist acts, homeland security, and the response to natural disasters. There will be interactive exercises as well as a case study approach used.

Child Protection and Juvenile Justice

Concentration Description:

This concentration is designed to meet the specific need of child protective workers, law enforcement officers, child advocates, school resource officers, community mental health workers, school police, Department of Juvenile Justice, Department of Children and Family Services, and others.

CJI 6910 - Theory of Child Protection, Investigation, and Advocacy (3 credits)

This course will focus on the interpretation of social and systemic policies and procedures of child welfare agencies and nongovernmental agencies with emphasis on child advocacy, due process, and institutional standards. Emphasis will also be included regarding the remediation, intervention, rehabilitation, education, and other services designed to reduce recidivism amongst children and their families.

CJI 6920 - Juvenile Justice: Systems, Structure, and Process (3 credits)

This course will focus on the response of law enforcement and other professionals in the protection of children in trouble or in need of services. Emphasis will be placed on an examination of the juvenile court as an institution, investigative process and forensic interview strategies needed to successfully classify and more accurately detect suspected child abuse, the policies and practices of agencies involved in processing children and youth through the juvenile justice system.

CJI 6930 - Family Dynamics: Motivation, Support and Communication (3 credits)

This course will examine the protective and risk factors associated with the developmental pathways internalized by youth through interaction with their family system. Emphasis will be given to child and youth development as it is affected by the family system, peer groups, schools and teachers, community and other social influences. In addition, the dynamics of traditional, non-traditional and culturally diverse family construction in contemporary society will be explored.

CJI 6940 - Victimology: Child Abuse and Exploited Children (3 credits)

This course introduces students to the field of victimology and explores its conceptual boundaries, basic concepts and literature. The course will be delimited by the exploration of the topics: family violence, child abuse including neglect, physical abuse, sexual abuse, and emotional and verbal abuse; and prevention, intervention and treatment issues associated with exploited children.

CJI 6950 - Safe Schools: Climate and Culture (3 credits)

This course provides students with an overview of school safety and is intended to prepare students to develop or strengthen strategies, activities, and processes that will enhance the safety and well being of students, staff, and community members. Emphasis will be placed on the interaction between stakeholders and the importance of building and sustaining community collaboration for the purpose of school safety. The importance of policies and procedures, legislative mandates, and current safe school standards will be explored.

Information Security

(Offered through the College of Computing and Engineering)

Concentration Description:

This concentration will focus on the rapidly growing global problems of maintaining and securing computer information. Important areas addressed include threats and vulnerabilities, cryptography, authentication and access control, security models, network security, trusted computer systems, distributed systems security, World Wide Web security, applications security, and security management and policies.

ISEC 0615: Fundamentals of Cybersecurity (3 credits)

An overview of the technical aspects of cybersecurity. Issues discussed include confidentiality, integrity, and availability (CIA), as well as authentication, access control, trust, and non-repudiation. Furthermore, topics covered include the threat types and attack vectors used for compromising computer and network security. Investigation of fundamental cybersecurity and assurance technologies that can be applied to mitigate threat vectors. The selection of appropriate information security applications, security lifecycles, as well as controls utilized to protect computers and networks from the variety of threat vectors will also be covered.

ISEC 0635 - Information Security Operations Management (3 credits)

Provides an understanding to implement effectively the information security vision and strategy set forth by the executive management. The emphasis will be on the management of an information security program. Focus is on the implementation of information security policy, information security planning, development of information security processes, and establishment of information security measures. Concepts and techniques from the management and organizational behavior disciplines will be integrated in order to identify and propose solutions to the problems of information security administration. Prerequisite: ISEC 615

ISEC 0655 - Information Security Governance (3 credits)

Challenges and opportunities of effectively governing an organization's information security requirements and resources. Information security governance lays out the vision for the information security program. Discussions include what constitutes good information security governance, and development of an effective information security strategy and policy. Also focuses on how to improve information security accountability, regulatory compliance, and maturity.

ISEC 0675 - Information System Auditing (3 credits)

This course will evaluate fundamental concepts related to an information systems audit. Principles and practices related to secure operation of existing information technology. Information security accountability, development of internal control objectives and framework, and identification of appropriate information systems audit procedures covering security, compliance, risk mitigation, and business continuity. Prerequisites: ISEC 0615, and ISEC 0635, or ISEC 0655

ISEC 0695: Information Security Management Project (3 credits)

This project course focuses on integrating best practices for protecting critical information infrastructures through national cybersecurity standards and systems assessments in order to help students develop a final information security project focusing on Information Security Policy Development and Compliance. Students may enroll in this class only after completing all of the information security core courses. Upon request, the course may be taken concurrently with one of the prerequisite courses. Such a request will only be approved in the last term of a student's matriculation, and students taking a prerequisite concurrently are subject to the same expectations as those who have completed all prerequisites. Students will work in teams to enhance their team building and communication skills, along with working on a real-life organizational project focus on Information Security Policy Development and Compliance. Prerequisites: ISEC 0615, ISEC 0635, ISEC 0655, ISEC 0675

Investigative Forensic Technology

Concentration Description:

This concentration will provide specialization training in the burgeoning field of forensic investigation. Students will be exposed to investigative and analysis techniques used during criminal investigations

CJI 6111 - Firearms, Fingerprints and Other Impression Evidence (3 credits)

This course will provide students with a broad overview of the impression evidence discipline in forensic science. Topics discussed will include firearms and tool mark examination and microscopy, footwear and tire concentration examination, and latent fingerprints. Current courtroom challenges such as Daubert issues related to impression evidence will also be discussed. Students will be evaluated on the concepts learned based on practical exercises, tests, final exam, and research paper.

CJI 6112 - Forensic Analysis of Trace and Drug Evidence (3 credits)

This course will be divided into two sections: Trace and Drugs. In the first segment we will cover the different drugs of abuse, the controlled substances act, dependency, and the forensic analysis of these samples. The Trace Evidence segment will include basic microscopy, fibers, paint, glass, fractures, hairs, explosives and arson. Concepts will be solidified via case studies.

CJI 6113 - Crime Scene (3 credits)

This course will provide students with an in depth understanding of the various steps to processing a crime scene such as: scene documentation, evidence collection and preservation, and interpretation. In addition, scene safety and current court room challenges will be discussed.

CJI 6114 - DNA Technology that Revolutionized Criminal Investigations (3 credits)

This course will provide students with a survey of the field of forensic genetics in an understandable manner. Topics will include presumptive testing, a history of serological analyses, the beginning of the era of DNA technology including RFLP and AMPFLP analysis. Newer methods of typing such as Short Tandem Repeat, Y-chromosome STR, SNP analysis, mitochondrial sequencing and finally mini-STRs will be explored. Case studies and examples of these methods will be examined and fully investigated empirically. This course would be an invaluable tool for the criminal investigator and attorneys or those students planning to work in such fields.

CJI 6115 - Overview of Crime Laboratory Management (3 credits)

A review of process management, work flow and future growth will be discussed. This course will provide students with a survey of manpower, quality assurance, safety, and budgeting issues. What job requirements are needed to perform the various jobs from Crime Scene Detective to DNA analyst. Accreditation, certification and outside review of laboratory performance will be explored. The C.S.I. effect and its impact on the modern forensic laboratory will be examined. The competing interests of case analysis, prosecution and investigation will be detailed.

Emergency Preparedness Leadership

(Offered through the Dr. Kiran C. Patel College of Osteopathic Medicine)

DEM 5050 - All-Hazard Preparedness (3 credits) (Required before taking any other courses in the concentration)

Students will review the ecological, sociological, environmental, and general health effects of disasters, natural and man-made. The course will explore the interprofessional roles and responsibilities of professionals, paraprofessionals, and volunteers in all-hazards emergency planning, response, mitigation, and recovery. Students will gain insights into all-hazards preparedness within the health system, community, and state and local agencies.

 

DEM 5090 - Weapons & Communicable Diseases (3 credits)

This course will provide students with an understanding of pandemic influenza and other communicable diseases. Students will also be introduced to potential chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosive weapons and will learn the expectations of preparations and response to a pandemic or CBRNE event. Prerequisite: DEM 5050

DEM 6423 - Interagency Disaster Communication (3 credits)

This course provides an overview of the history, principles and organizational structure of the Incident Command System (ICS) and will identify the core components of the ICS and the National Incident Management System (NIMS). Topics will include communication, pre-and post-mitigation planning, operational concepts, prioritization of target capabilities, and development of an Incident Response Plan (IRP). Prerequisite DEM 5050

DEM 6424 - Community Disaster Preparedness (3 credits)

This course will emphasize disaster resistant communities and will provide information on preparing and developing partnerships within the community. Regardless of the nature of the incident, intentional or non-intentional, law enforcement may be charged with enforcing public health orders, securing contaminated areas and health facilities, providing protection and support for the transportation of national stockpiles, and control of civil unrest. Resources may be overwhelmed and the ability to respond will depend on preparation and partnerships within the community. Prerequisite: DEM 5050

CJI 6125 - Special Topics in All-Hazards Preparedness (3 credits)

This course is a capstone research and experience course for the student. Each student will select a topic of interest related to all-hazards preparedness research. In addition, students must take part in an approved community project at the volunteer or professional level in the all-hazards field. Prerequisite: DEM 5050.


Students must choose one or a combination of electives below to obtain a minimum of 3 credit hours:

  • One, three (3) credit class

    Students may choose any two three credit courses within their degree program, excluding the required courses, and apply those credits toward the electives requirement.

  • Practicum Placement (3 credits)

    This practicum will provide the Master of Science in Criminal Justice student with first-hand experience working within the field. During the semester, students will have the opportunity to observe various entities within a department or agency. S/he will engage in direct activity while assigned to Master of Science in Criminal Justice practicum. Direct activity includes but is not limited to observation of role model, attending lectures, and performing assigned duties.

  • Master's Thesis (6 credits)
    Work with NSU faculty member creating your own research project.

Application Requirements

To ensure that your application is complete, please use the checklist below and follow the detailed instructions provided for each item. All documents that are submitted to the University will need to include your name on each page. 

  1. Complete online application form.
  2. Application fee of $50 (in U.S. dollars) made payable to Nova Southeastern University will be charged for each application submitted.
  3. Baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution with a grade point average (GPA) of 2.5 or higher or a master's degree with an overall GPA of 3.0 or better.
  4. Submit two letters of recommendation from current professors, employers, supervisors, or similar people most familiar with your professional experience. Letters of recommendation must be less than one year old.
  5. Official transcripts from all colleges or universities you attended are required. All applicants must hold a baccalaureate from a regionally accredited institution. Official electronic transcripts  can be sent to electronictranscript@nova.edu or mailed to the address below:

    Applicants who have attended foreign universities or colleges are required to have their academic credentials evaluated for U.S. institutional equivalence. Please visit the National Association of Credential Evaluation Services for more information. International students are encouraged to contact the Office of International Student Services at (954) 262-7240 or 800-541-6682, ext. 27240, or by email at intl@nova.edu, or visit the Office of International Students and Scholars.

  6. Provide a personal statement of between 150 and 300 words indicating your goals in pursuing a Master of Science in Criminal Justice. This statement must be attached to the application.

Please Mail Items To

Nova Southeastern University
Enrollment Processing Services
Attn: Abraham S. Fischler College of Education
3301 College Avenue P.O. Box 299000
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33329-9905

If you have any questions about the admissions process, call (954) 262-8500 / 800-986-3223, 28500, or email eduinfo@nova.edu.


Deadlines

term offered preferred admissions deadline
Fall  August 1
Winter  December 10
Summer  April 20

Please watch our own Dr. Grace Telesco discuss important and supportive information for all of us in staying vigilant for children and families during the Coronavirus (Covid-19) outbreak.

Criminal Justice Facebook Live Chats

NSU professor Dr. Grace Telesco and criminal justice reform activist/advocate Desmond Meade discuss the system and how to turn your passion into action.

 

Dr. Marcelo Castro, Associate Dean of the School of Criminal Justice

Click on the image above to learn more about the undergraduate and graduate programs in Criminal Justice that can help you become the hero your community needs!

Return to top of page