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Maureen McDermott

Maureen McDermott
Associate Professor
Department of Curriculum and Instruction
(954) 262-8549 mmcdermo@nova.edu

Education

  • Ed.D., Florida International University

Maureen McDermott, Ed.D., joined the Fischler College of Education in the Secondary English department in January 2005 as an adjunct professor. In September 2011, she was named content area facilitator for the M.S. and Ed.S. English Education programs. She teaches courses in English Education, and Curriculum and Teaching. Her research and publications focus on technology integration into the language arts curriculum, writing process methods, and challenging stereotyping to reduce stigma of marginalized populations. Dr. McDermott led the Secondary English Education program with its cadre of meritorious part-time professors to national recognition status with NCATE in 2013.

Since publishing her Master’s thesis about the writing process in 1993, she has continued to research and redefine her own approach to writing while sharing her work with others in the classroom and at local, state, national, and international conferences. Dr. McDermott has been a certified teacher consultant with the National Writing Project since 2003, and she has extensive background with Common Core. She has presented at National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) Conference on English Education / International Federation for the Teaching of English (CEE/IFTE), Florida Council of Teachers of English (FCTE), Secondary Reading Council of Florida (SRCFL), and the Florida Distance Learning Association (FDLA). Dr. McDermott is also a member of NSU’s Inclusion and Diversity Council, and she interviews incoming freshmen for the President’s and Premier Scholarship. Dr. McDermott is a native of South Florida who had almost two decades of experience in the K-12 environment before coming to NSU.

Research Areas of Interest:

  • Technology integration into language arts curriculum
  • Writing process methods
  • Challenging stereotyping of marginalized populations
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